Chance to rediscover past

National Trust of Australia education officers, from left, Kim Hawkes and Diana Frylinck among some of the oldest tombstones at East Perth Cemeteries. Picture: Marcus Whisson d410667
National Trust of Australia education officers, from left, Kim Hawkes and Diana Frylinck among some of the oldest tombstones at East Perth Cemeteries. Picture: Marcus Whisson d410667

Whether that be an early settler or migrant who forged their path in the early days of the Swan River Colony or more well known figures including Sir John Septimus Roe, John Chipper (Perth’s first paid policeman) or George Leake (the third Premier).

Originally known as Cemetery Hill, established in 1830, the site was used as the main burial ground for the colony until the end of the 19th century.

The last burial was in 1919.

Since then the site has been neglected, reduced in size and more recently regenerated to encourage more people to explore the grounds and learn about the state’s past.

The cemetery is opening on November 17, as part of the Perth Heritage Days weekend, offering people a chance to rediscover the site.

Heritage Perth executive director Richard Offen said visitors entering the grounds would get specific information about settlers, their graves and memorials.

‘It is a wonderful opportunity for people to rediscover an integral part of our city’s heritage through their Searching for Settlers in the City project,’ he said.

Other sites open throughout Perth for the Heritage Days weekend include the Terrace Hotel, London Court, Kirkman House, Bon Marche Arcade and St Brigid’s Church.

Perth Heritage Days
When: November 16 and 17
Cost: Free
More info: heritageperth.com