Have a roaring good time at the museum

Museum palaeontologist Dr Mikael Siversson encounters a carcharodontosaurus on the hunt. Picture: Marcus Whisson www.communitypix.com.au d418315
Museum palaeontologist Dr Mikael Siversson encounters a carcharodontosaurus on the hunt. Picture: Marcus Whisson www.communitypix.com.au d418315

More than 20 years on, a collection of prehistoric predators has landed in Perth for the Australian debut of Dinosaur Discovery: Lost Creatures of the Cretaceous at the WA Museum until August 3.

Palaeontologist Mikael Siversson said the Cretaceous period, which was preceded by the Jurassic era, was the most interesting time for dinosaurs because of the diversity.

‘That’s when we had the highest diversity of dinosaurs, a huge range,’ Dr Siversson said.

‘Anything from raptor dinosaurs with feathers to dinosaurs with huge claws to dinosaurs with a huge sail on their back.’

Standing next to an almost six metre tall animatronic model of carnivore carcharodontosaurus, Dr Siversson told the Express the predator looked similar to a T-Rex, his favourite dinosaur, but the two creatures were not closely related.

‘This dinosaur here is part of a North African display,’ he said. ‘Both the spinosaurus (largest meat eating dinosaur) and carcharodontosaurus lived in the same area in North Africa 100 million years ago.

‘We have them sort of positioned in an antagonistic posture here, these would have met in real life and they would have fought at times.’

Dr Siversson said palaeontologists’ understanding of dinosaurs had changed dramatically over the years.

Some 20 years after the Jurassic Park movie was released, scientists discovered velociraptors were not scaly but instead covered in feathers and ancestors of birds.