Students Uniting Nations summit teaches students cultural tolerance

Cultural awareness: Olivia Cockroft, of Yokine primary, Ana Senic, of St Andrew’s Grammar, Khairul Muhammad, of Australian Islamic College, Asher Altschuler ,of Carmel primary, and Emma Banoski, of Sutherland Dianella Primary schools.
Cultural awareness: Olivia Cockroft, of Yokine primary, Ana Senic, of St Andrew’s Grammar, Khairul Muhammad, of Australian Islamic College, Asher Altschuler ,of Carmel primary, and Emma Banoski, of Sutherland Dianella Primary schools.

LAUNCHED in 2001 in the wake of September 11, the Students Uniting Nations (SUN) summit aims to break down perceived differences between students with different religions.

About 250 Year 6 students attended last week’s SUN event at Carmel School in Dianella.

Participating schools included the Australian Islamic College, St Andrew’s Grammar School, St Kieran’s Catholic School, Carmel School, Sutherland Dianella Primary School and Yokine Primary School.

Head of Carmel Primary School Lynda Fisher said the program identified individual attributes of students attending the schools and invited a consideration of the differences in culture and religions.

‘It teaches children respect and the need to tolerate difference,’ Mrs Fisher said.

‘It gets them thinking about their own ethical understandings and values and the options available to solve problems and achieve harmony in society. Inevitably the students realise that even though we may appear to be different, we are all the same too.’

Perth MLA Eleni Evangel opened the day’s activities and told students how proud she was of her own cultural heritage.

‘Today is a really important day,’ Ms Evangel said.

‘You’ve all come together today to celebrate unique differences

‘Be really proud of where you came from and who you are, but make sure you give back to community where you live.’

A panel of religious leaders from different faiths questioned students to increase their knowledge and deconstruct preconceived ideas.