Pride parades the changes

The daytime parade is expected to attract more families and those reluctant to visit the area at night.

Fairday will also be split in two as part of a radical shakeup of the LGBTI body’s events calender, revealed at a community forum last week.

Hyde Park will host a modified Fairday including a picnic, stalls and community entertainment in February, while the larger outdoor music festival will retain a licensed event in Russell Square directly after the parade.

It is hoped the new format will appeal to a broader range of community members by staging two distinct events targeting different demographics.

About 30 people attended the forum outlining coming changes to local businesses, community groups and the public.

Last month, the Guardian Express reported that a newly elected committee was working to ensure an outdated and cash-strapped Pride WA evolved.

Co-presidents Michelle Rigg and Daniel Smith said the long overdue changes would help meet the needs of today’s LGBTI community.

‘Our community has changed incredibly from Pride’s early days fighting for gay and lesbian rights in WA, and it’s time Pride adapted to reflect the changed needs and aspirations of our community,’ Ms Rigg said.

Mr Smith said Pride’s vision was to create an organisation that staged world-class events.

Under the new plans, floats look set to trump previous years, with local artists to be enlisted to work with community groups and businesses in a pilot program to develop vibrant, quality entries.

The November parade will start Pridefest, a three-week festival of arts, culture and community events that should grow in future with increased funding.

Pride WA spokeswoman Laura Foster said those who attended the forum were positive about the changes, with two Northbridge business owners welcoming the expected boost in trade the new midday timeslot could attract.