Smart way to shore up the city

IBM team members Ian Watson-Jones, Jeffrey Wells, Lijun Sun, Deb Bolk and Luciano Dallolio.
IBM team members Ian Watson-Jones, Jeffrey Wells, Lijun Sun, Deb Bolk and Luciano Dallolio.

A team of international and local IBM experts will work in partnership with local agencies to explore the use of data to help the City improve essential utilities and infrastructure services.

IBM team members will meet with the State Government, residents, businesses and organisations as part of the pro bono engagement, which is valued at US$500,000.

IBM will then present the City with a comprehensive set of recommendations.

The City was awarded the grant in March this year after submitting a report detailing some of its key issues.

Ms Scaffidi said the project was an exciting opportunity for Perth, one of only two Australian cities to receive the grant this year.

‘The team will be examining how the City can best co-ordinate and use its existing data sources and link those to data held by other key state agencies,’ she said.

‘By so doing, we seek to create platforms for real-time essential services knowledge infrastructure, such as in traffic and transport, water and energy.’

Ms Scaffidi said the City had experienced infrastructure issues in the past.

‘Water pipes bursting comes to mind as an issue,’ she said.

‘The aim is to use this evidence-based knowledge to plan and prepare more effectively for potential service failures and emergency scenarios and for city growth.

‘We’re all on the same team ” the Perth team.’

Ian Watson-Jones from San Francisco in the US said: ‘I’m happy for the chance to work with local government.’

Li Jun Sun from Beijing in China said: ‘Perth is a beautiful city and I am pleased to be here.’

Jeffrey Wells from Melbourne said: ‘I’m excited to be here and am ready for the meetings to start.’

Deborah Bolk from Fort Collins in the US said: ‘I’m extremely excited to be in Perth.’

Luciano Dallolio from Sao Paulo in Brazil said: ‘It is a pleasure to be in Perth and make a difference.’