Sorry Day: Perth College students told of day’s significance by Aboriginal leader Jim Morrison


Front: Demi Sipsas, Grace Wyeth and Mikayla Morrison  next to her grandfather Jim Morrison; back: Mackenzie Haywood, Ashlyn Howatson and Morgan Goddey. Picture: Andrew Ritchie d454726
Front: Demi Sipsas, Grace Wyeth and Mikayla Morrison next to her grandfather Jim Morrison; back: Mackenzie Haywood, Ashlyn Howatson and Morgan Goddey. Picture: Andrew Ritchie d454726

INFLUENTIAL Aboriginal leader Jim Morrison spoke to students of injustices done to his family and other Indigenous people in a first for Perth College.

Invited by his Year 9 granddaughter Mikayla Morrison to speak before Sorry Day last week, the co-founder and Board member of Reconciliation WA and co-convenor of the Bringing Them Home committee explained how the Australian government tried to “breed out the black”.

“Sorry Day is a serious day for me,” he said.

“I had 30 parents stolen, dad was the oldest of 23 and mum was one of seven; uncles and aunties are considered parents (in our culture).

“It is a dreadful part of Australian history that is not taught in all schools.”

He encouraged students to think about how they would feel if they were locked up at school and never saw their family again.

Mr Morrison called for Aboriginal culture to be part of the school curriculum so these injustices could be taught and people could learn from them.

“(There are) The Voice contestants whose family members were stolen; it’s there in your face now,” he said.

“It is important for kids to understand why there is a level of dysfunction.

“It’s not ancient history, it’s something we should be learning now and aboriginal culture should be in the curriculum.

“That’s how proper reconciliation starts.”