Trail celebrates

Cambridge Mayor Keri Shannon at the end of the new Whadjuk Trail.
Picture: Andrew Ritchie        www.communitypix.com.au   d448305
Cambridge Mayor Keri Shannon at the end of the new Whadjuk Trail. Picture: Andrew Ritchie        www.communitypix.com.au d448305

Yange Kep Bidi (wetland trail), which starts at Freshwater Bay on the Swan River foreshore and finishes at Lake Monger, was recently opened to the public and at 21.2km in length, is the longest of the three connected trails.

Lake Monger sits between the suburbs of Leederville, Wembley and Glendalough.

The network is an initiative of community groups from the Western Suburbs Regional Organisation of Councils (WESROC).

Ms Shannon said it was fundamental for local governments to acknowledge and celebrate places that are culturally significant to Aboriginal people.

“Personally, I’ve always thought that it should be celebrated and that’s how you can entrench it in your history,” she said.

“I think it’s a really valuable thing to do and it’s a nice way of layering that history and getting an affinity with that history.

“It’s a bit like the Bibbulmun Track – kind of like a metropolitan Bibbulmun Track.”

Ms Shannon said the network would encourage people to get outdoors and get active.

“This is about using your leisure to make the most of your natural environment and I think it is a really nice way of doing that,” she said.

“It is lovely that all the councils have got together and made the trail.”

The trails link remnant bushland, heritage trails and significant Aboriginal sites.