Walk Together: Girls Academy leadership camp brings high schoolers together at Kings Park event


More than 120 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander high school girls gathered in Kings Park for Walk Together.

Aunty Barbara Pickett and Aunty Elsie Ugle at the Walk Together event.
More than 120 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander high school girls gathered in Kings Park for Walk Together. Aunty Barbara Pickett and Aunty Elsie Ugle at the Walk Together event.

WITH research showing WA has the country’s worst gap in education outcomes, more than 120 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander high school girls gathered in Kings Park this week to raise awareness.

The event Walk Together was part of a three-day leadership camp run by the Girls Academy.

It came in light of research published by the Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre in June which showed WA has the worst gap in the country in the terms of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students completing Year 12.

According to the research, only 44.7 per cent of Aboriginal students who start high school in WA finish Year 12, which is 38.1 per cent less than non-Aboriginal students.

Michelle DeLacy, a Girls Academy development officer at Esperance Senior High School, said there was a significant gap in investment in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander girls’ education.

“These girls are the future of their communities, they are the next generation of leaders,” she said.

“Their prospects shape their community, and we need to give them the chance to realise their full potential.”

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