Hills bauxite mining campaign digs up more opposition

President of the Avon and Hills Mining Awareness Group Brian Dale (with green box) delivers a second petition to Opposition environment spokesman Chris Tallentire (to the right of green box) outside Parliament House on Wednesday.
President of the Avon and Hills Mining Awareness Group Brian Dale (with green box) delivers a second petition to Opposition environment spokesman Chris Tallentire (to the right of green box) outside Parliament House on Wednesday.

DEMONSTRATORS against bauxite mining in the Perth Hills returned to the steps of Parliament House on Wednesday to lobby Opposition spokesman on the environment and climate change, Chris Tallentire.

“If the Felicitas and Fortuna proposals go ahead, Mauravillo Estate will be surrounded on three sides by open cut bauxite mining,” Mr Dale said.

“The proposals are socially and environmentally irresponsible and will destroy tens of kilometres of native bush and remnant vegetation.”

Other concerns are the risks of contamination to harvested rainwater for drinking, which communities depend on, the impact on ground water and the loss of thousands of hectares of productive farmland.

“With a mine site comes the noise of crushers, dump trucks, blasting and the constant sound of a 20km conveyor belt from Wundowie to the Avon River,” Mr Dale said.

“Consider living near dust clouds containing silica, Al203 (aluminium oxide) and other particles that are harmful to humans?”

Campaigners want to see local farmland protected.

They say the biggest resource demand on the planet will be for greater food production and the Darling Scarp has a long-standing record of reliable rainfall.

Mr Dale said the joint venture between Chinese-owned Yank-uang Resources and Bauxite Resource Limited (BRL) was in a long-standing dispute; according to an October ASX announcement, termination of BAJV is imminent.

“Yankuang looks set to become 100 per cent owners of the Felicitas and Fortuna mining proposals, and owners of all live tenements currently owned by BAJV, including parts of the Avon Valley national park,” Mr Dale said.