Landholders join fight

Quairading farmer Greg Hayes will get a mix of seedlings, fencing and baits as part of the |biodiversity project.
Quairading farmer Greg Hayes will get a mix of seedlings, fencing and baits as part of the |biodiversity project.

The Federal Government’s Connecting Biodiversity Across the Wheatbelt program was announced last year.

Project manager Jen Vincent, from the Shire of Quairading, said about 50 landholders across 15 shires had been successful in applying for funding.

The first round would be used for 158km of fencing to protect native vegetation, baits to protect more than 1200ha of land from foxes and rabbits, and the planting of 275,000 native seedlings over 250ha of cleared land.

‘Farmers have the opportunity to get their hands on free seedlings and fencing to create wildlife corridors, by connecting important remnant vegetation on their properties,’ Ms Vincent said.

Each landholder will also be provided with funding to protect the newly connected landscapes from pests.

‘The program will enhance habitat and create well-functioning ecosystems for our unique native plant and animal species,’ Ms Vincent said.

‘We hope the project will build capacity among landholders to manage and protect their bushland and reduce the spread of invasive weeds and pests.’

Landholders are now able to apply for the second round of funding.

‘If farmers are daunted by the application process, they should speak with their local natural resource management officer, who is more than happy to help out,’ Ms Vincent said.

Applications for the program close on April 24.

For more information, contact your local shire’s natural resource management officer.