Louder voice for residents

The council unanimously passed a resolution to form the committees, which will have a number of community members becoming more engaged in the council’s decision-|making process.

Previously there was only an audit committee, which met once a year and did not include any members of the public.

A works committee has been established to provide advice on roadworks, drainage and related matters. The council nominated that a minimum of three councillors be part of that committee.

The shire’s acting chief executive Michael Keeble will seek expressions of interest from the public to join the committee before the next council meeting.

A finance, audit and risk committee was also created. It will supersede the audit committee and play a key role in assisting the council on financial reporting, internal control, internal control structure, risk management systems, legislative compliance, ethical accountability, and internal and external audit functions.

Two members of the public will be sought to fill positions in that committee. The shire said at least three councillors would join the committee.

A new heritage advisory committee will advise the council on strategic heritage-related projects and make recommendations to the council about further work required to document and protect York’s natural, built and cultural heritage. It will also provide an advocacy role for heritage in York and help the council source external funding opportunities to further heritage, conservation, promotion, management and education.

Membership will consist of two councillors, a planning manager, a museum curator, a heritage advisor, representatives from the museum committee, representatives from the York Society and a minimum of two community members.

The council nominated Crs Reid and Smythe to the committee and also nominated the council’s planning manager, museum curator and heritage advisor.

Shire of York President Matthew Reid said he was pleased to have the community more involved with the council’s decision making.

‘These new committees are essential,’ Mr Reid said. ‘It’s so important that the community feels engaged and we are giving them more of a voice in council decisions.’