One Nation Senate candidate says Brexit vote ‘good’ for Aussie farmers


Rod Culleton and Pauline Hanson campaigning in WA. Picture: supplied
Rod Culleton and Pauline Hanson campaigning in WA. Picture: supplied

THE recent Brexit vote in Britain is good for Australian farmers according to former Williams farmer and Senate hopeful Rod Culleton.

Mr Culleton is running in WA on the One Nation Party ticket and hopes to win a seat in the Upper House.

He would like to see a focus back on agricultural production in Australia.

“Australia needs to realise this country is not all about extractables but what we can offer is better quality food and exports for places like the UK,” he said.

“With the Brexit result reverberating around the world I think it shows nobody wants to be dictated to by another body like the European Union.

“It’s not in the best interest of the nation and we can capitalise on opening up this state for good agriculture.

“It’s geographically well placed to start these industries and support for water with the Ord River location and the sunshine, the freight costs would be minimal if you consider how close the land is here to Indonesia for food exports.

“Agriculture is a clean industry and while the banks are foreclosing on other people’s farms, this is a way for the farmers to say ‘stop, we will not play Russian roulette with our farms’.”

Mr Culleton said the banks had tried to ruin many farms by forcing them to go too big.

“The answer is in small industries from these spaces, not huge businesses,” he said.

“Israel has it right with all the smaller co-ops.

“One Nation stands for the idea that even with mandatory superannuation we could consider the opportunities and that money could be used to buy Kidman Station and Australians can benefit from a non-corporatised entity.

“We need to bring back co-ops and the food bowl for quality and business and extractible and protein and energy for the world.”

Mr Culleton said he wanted more prosperity for Western Australia.

“Israel has these small co-op businesses working very efficiently,” he said.

“You can’t tell me that the farm foreclosures in Queensland where they have told people there is no market for dairy products is correct.

“I’m calling for the farm gate price to be improved and for milk companies to say we don’t want your milk is astonishing given that there and 27 million people in Asia wanting cheese, milk and yoghurt.”

Mr Culleton said the banks had to stop lying to consumers and farm owners in Australia.