Stitched and Bound: WA Quilters’ Association exhibition at Zig Zag Gallery


Elizabeth Humphreys of Kalamunda and Anne Williams of Gooseberry Hill getting ready for the Stitched and Bound 2017 exhibition at the Zigzag Gallery in Kalamunda from July 14. Picture: David Baylis
Elizabeth Humphreys of Kalamunda and Anne Williams of Gooseberry Hill getting ready for the Stitched and Bound 2017 exhibition at the Zigzag Gallery in Kalamunda from July 14. Picture: David Baylis

AN exhibition of innovative and contemporary quilting will open at Kalamunda’s Zig Zag Gallery this week.

The Western Australian Quilters’ Association show Stitched and Bound 2017 runs from July 14 to 30 at the Railway Road venue.

Quilt artists Elizabeth Humphreys, of Kalamunda, and Anne Williams, of Gooseberry Hill, will both be exhibiting.

Humphreys’ interest in early Australian history and the natural environment inspires her work.

Her quilt is called Twilight at Whistlepipe Creek.

She likes to experiment with hand dying, printing and various textiles.

“The forests and goldfields of WA influence my art quilt practise,” she said.

“I take many photographs while travelling to use as inspiration in later works.”

Williams uses natural fabrics including cotton, linen and some silk, preferably recycled.

She has a strong focus on wall quilts and small fabric artists’ books.

“The amount of wastage of textiles concerns me so I try to bring new life to what we often just throw out,” she said.

“The design process may arise from looking at the possibilities of materials on hand but increasingly from the use of 5A visual notebooks where sketches (often on the back of envelopes), ideas, writing, observations, quotes, poems, paint and pencil jostle together.

“Hand stitching is the main technique I use.”

The gallery is open 9am to 4pm weekdays and 10am to 4pm weekends with entry free.

MORE: Claremont rangers and parking officers to be equipped with body worn cameras

MORE: Fremantle Chocolate Market: Esplanade Hotel to host another tasty day out after success of bacon festival

MORE: Psychologist using Dungeons & Dragons in treatment of teens