WA Rocks Perth Hills thrilled rock hunt has taken off with kids

BACK ROW L-R: Reid Mavay (4), Amber Neylon (2), Rory Neylon (3).  FROM FRONT TO BACK SEATED: Aria Hughes (3), Angus Parker (9), Reggie Parker (10), Bonnie Parker (11) and Maddy Parker (12).  Picture: David Baylis   d470193
Maddy Parker (12), Angus Parker (9), Reggie Parker (10) and Bonnie Parker (11).  Picture: David Baylis   d470193
BACK ROW L-R: Reid Mavay (4), Amber Neylon (2), Rory Neylon (3). FROM FRONT TO BACK SEATED: Aria Hughes (3), Angus Parker (9), Reggie Parker (10), Bonnie Parker (11) and Maddy Parker (12). Picture: David Baylis d470193 Maddy Parker (12), Angus Parker (9), Reggie Parker (10) and Bonnie Parker (11). Picture: David Baylis d470193

IT is as simple as hunting for rocks but a nationwide hide-and-seek craze has attracted a strong following in the region.

WA Rocks Perth Hills and surrounds co-ordinator Kelly Neylon, of Chidlow, said rocks covered in creative designs were tagged with the group name and hidden in parks and recreational areas to then be found.

Photos and clues were posted on the WA Rocks Facebook page for other players and again when they are found for the original hider to see.

“Once found, you can rehide it in the same area or take it back home to rehide it in another area,” Mrs Neylon said.

She said the movement was to encourage children to be creative and to get them outside, with parents sharing their gratitude to organisers for helping reduce screen time in their homes.

“Really, the craze has been brought to the Hills by people finding rocks, seeing our symbol on the back and logging in to discover us,” she said.

“I myself have been going to parks all across the Shire of Mundaring and beyond, handing out information packs and free rocks for families who are interested.”

She said they would soon be holding free activities to get more families involved.

“Over 20,000 people are involved throughout WA and we are seeing our rocks move around suburbs as children find them and take them back home,” she said.

“This is very exciting. I have personally seen people travel as far as Fremantle to especially look at Sculpture Park and find rocks as it’s become one of the more popular playgrounds on the site.

“This is great for the Perth Hills’ tourism.”

She said their oldest member was 85 and their youngest were just one and two years old.

“The feedback and response from families has been so rewarding,” she said.

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