Duncraig students become forensic scientists

Year 3 students Hannah Wilson and Indi Baker. Photo: Martin Kennealey
Year 3 students Hannah Wilson and Indi Baker. Photo: Martin Kennealey

DAVALLIA Primary School became a crime scene this week with students transforming into forensic scientists who needed to solve the mystery of missing gold.

The activity was part of a two-week education program incorporating science, technologies, engineering and mathematics (STEM) designed to teach students about real-life problem solving.

As part of the STEM Week organising committee, teacher Vicki Secrett said the inaugural program offered hands-on learning experiences based on four subjects in a fun and interactive way to engage students.

“The freedom to explore, collaborate and have heaps of fun during STEM Week motivates students to think innovatively and enjoy taking risks on their learning journey,” she said.

“This is key to developing the life-long problem solving skills and strategies that underpin rewarding, successful learning.”

One of the activities students were involved in was ‘a case of discovery’ where a real-to-life crime scene investigation was presented, and a series of forensic evidence experiments was set up for the students to track down missing gold and jewels.

Ms Secrett said students worked through the case, taking fingerprints, creating coin impressions, building a DNA model and cracking a safe code, while learning how chemistry, physics and biology could help solve crimes.

“Some classes were involved in the Scitech Alcoa Maths Enrichment Program, increasing student engagement and confidence in maths by incorporating creativity, play and connection to the real world,” she said.

“The impact of STEM was also taken beyond the walls of our school as our students fundraised to purchase and assemble Solarbuddy solar lights, being sent to children facing the challenges of living without electricity.”