Edgewater: Joondalup council refuses 14-unit development in Chipala Court

An artist's impressions of the proposed 14-unit apartment complex across 1 and 3 Chipala Court in Edgewater.
An artist's impressions of the proposed 14-unit apartment complex across 1 and 3 Chipala Court in Edgewater.

AN apartment building proposed for Chipala Court in Edgewater has again been refused.

Joondalup councillors at yesterday’s meeting unanimously opposed the $2 million 14-unit development across 1 and 3 Chipala Court after the same plans were refused by the Metro North-West Joint Development Assessment Panel last month.

Cr Philippa Taylor, who was on the panel, said while there was a gap in the housing market and new developments were a boost to residents, she could not support a proposal that had a “basic disregard for residents and the surrounding amenity”.

An artist’s impressions of the proposed 14-unit apartment complex across 1 and 3 Chipala Court in Edgewater.

“It’s disappointing this is still not compliant on several levels,” she said.

She said issues included a building height of more than 8m in lieu of the allowed 7m, street setbacks of 1.7m, 1.4m and 0.2m instead of the required minimum of 2m and a 4m high retaining wall that should only be 0.75m, reducing sightlines and making it dangerous for drivers.

 

Consultants on the job

CONSULTANCY work to help the City of Joondalup with its work into the ongoing density and infill development issues has started.

In giving an update to concerned Edgewater residents, planning and community development director Dale Page said the community could expect to be contacted “directly by the consultants” about mid-September.

She said this would include all information about “how, where and when residents can provide input in various ways”.

“There are three different opportunities leading up to development of the strategy where people will be able to have input,” she said.

“The contract period is for 23 to 24 weeks so we should have a solution to the issue we are facing for final consideration by the council early next year.”

Ms Page said since Taylor Burrell Barnett was appointed last month, they had held “inception meetings” and they were “busy doing a review of the past documents including all the consultation”.

“They have just finalised preparation of a comprehensive draft engagement and consultation strategy, which needs reviewing,” she said.

“And they are already in the process of putting together some of the consultation material.”

 

Fight turns to Tuart Trail proposal

CONCERNED Edgewater residents now shift their fight to another 14-unit development across 7 and 56 Tuart Trail.

More than 60 residents attended a meeting at the site on Saturday to discuss the two-storey proposal.

Residents attended a meeting in Tuart Trail, Edgewater to discuss a proposed 14-unit development.

Edgewater Community Residents Association secretary Beth Hewitt said the development “pays no heed to the existing streetscape and will dominate the corner on which it is built”.

“The quiet street will see at least a 48 per cent increase in traffic, yet will not receive any footpaths to allow children to safely walk to school,” she said.

At Tuesday’s Joondalup council meeting, she also raised issues for neighbouring residents with 21 cars to be parked at the rear of the property “all entering and leaving along with the rubbish trucks from the driveway adjacent to number 5”.

She said the resident at number 10 would also have car lights “flashing into his bedroom window with every nocturnal movement” and number 54 would lose privacy in their backyard swimming pool.

“Worse if the loss of a significant mature tree from the backyard of number 54,” she said.

“The cumulative effect of all these developments is a growing concern for all of us.”

Artist impressions of the 14-unit development across 7 and 56 Tuart Trail.

John Marchant, of 10 Tuart Trail, said the proposal was “out of character and an eyesore” and would see residents and visitors parking on the road and road verge.

“With kids playing, this is a recipe for disaster,” he said.

Mayor Albert Jacob said the City was not the decision-making authority on the proposal because it was due to go before the Metro North-West Joint Development Assessment Panel.

However, he said City officers would prepare a report and recommendation for the panel.

Artist impressions of the 14-unit development across 7 and 56 Tuart Trail.

Planning and community development director Dale Page said the community consultation was being conducted and officers would ensure the development was “assessed very carefully inline with the Residential Design Codes and our local planning policy”.

“We will also assess it inline with a draft document the State Government is looking at – Design WA – and that is a policy that will deal with apartments.”