Feast of fun in kindy’s new mud kitchen: Padbury

Kindergarten students Eliana Chang, Arlie Carbone and Arjun Sanger learn the finer points of mud cookery. Picture: Martin Kennealey        www.communitypix.com.au   d444190
Kindergarten students Eliana Chang, Arlie Carbone and Arjun Sanger learn the finer points of mud cookery. Picture: Martin Kennealey        www.communitypix.com.au d444190

KINDERGARTEN students in Padbury have been preparing mud pie feasts since their custom-built kitchen opened.

Youngsters at St Stephen’s School Early Learning Centre came up with the idea for a mud kitchen earlier this year, primary school head Tracey Gray told the Times.

“Our kindy children came up with the idea that they would like to create a mud kitchen so they could create mud pies and those sorts of things,” she said.

Mrs Gray said it turned into an opportunity for a school and community partnership, with the outdoor kitchen opening last term.

“A number of our school community donated materials and also their time in developing the mud kitchen,” she said. “It’s truly wonderful when you see a school community, staff and parents, all working together.”

Mrs Gray said parent David Carbone was instrumental in the project, transforming a grassed area with a little sandpit into a kitchen with vegetable garden beds.

She said the early learning centre had about 60 four-year-old students who started using the kitchen last term.

“They absolutely love it – getting themselves stuck into making mud pies and cakes,” she said.

“It allows them to really get their imaginations going.

“It’s something that our children for many years will be able to enjoy.”

Balcatta business WCT Distributors donated $3800 worth of material for the mud kitchen.

Owner and Managing Director of WCT Distributors, Adrian Mason, jumped on board once he heard that the school were looking to upgrade their outdoor area.

“My daughter, Scarlett, attends St Stephen’s Early Learning Centre and we wanted to do our bit to help out,” Mr Mason said.

He said the composite decking product was made from 95 per cent recycled content, including plastic, wood and sawdust.

And it did not deteriorate like traditional timber decks or need sealing, oiling or staining.