Greenwood College improves sustainability with electric composter

Year 10 students Rita Gasol, Lara Lucienne Witzel and Charlene Keyser. Photo: Martin Kennealey
Year 10 students Rita Gasol, Lara Lucienne Witzel and Charlene Keyser. Photo: Martin Kennealey

GREENWOOD College’s electric composter is helping to pave the way for sustainable waste management in schools.

Environment Minister Stephen Dawson joined staff and students on campus last week to showcase the composter and learn more about it.

Funded through the Waste Wise Schools program, the composter uses technology to educate students on the importance of reducing waste.

The electric composter. Photo: Martin Kennealey

Established on-site earlier this year, the unit has the capacity to take 20kg of food waste per day, diverting 100kg of food waste from landfill each week and four tonnes per year.

Acting principal Jeff Pohara said this allowed the school to process food scraps including fruit, vegetable, bread, meat, poultry and small bones from student lunches, the canteen and cooking classes and it was proving more diverse than a worm farm or home compost system.

“The effort by Greenwood College to implement this composting unit and educate students and staff on how to use it safely and efficiently shows a commitment to change, which directly benefits the environment,” Mr Dawson said.

Year 10 students Rita Gasol, Lara Lucienne Witzel and Charlene Keyser get composting. Photo: Martin Kennealey

“This innovative thinking helps increase students’ awareness and understanding of the benefits of waste avoidance, re-use and recycling.”

Greenwood College is one of four WA high schools trialling electric composting units on campus this year.

Following the trial, the school plans to evaluate the system and roll out further infrastructure to improve waste management.