Joondalup returns original coat of arms to Wanneroo

Joondalup honorary Freemen Brian Cooper, Nick Trandos, Margaret Cockman and Bill Marwick with Joondalup Mayor Albert Jacob and Wanneroo Mayor Tracey Roberts holding the crest. Picture supplied
Joondalup honorary Freemen Brian Cooper, Nick Trandos, Margaret Cockman and Bill Marwick with Joondalup Mayor Albert Jacob and Wanneroo Mayor Tracey Roberts holding the crest. Picture supplied

THE original City of Wanneroo coat of arms that once adorned the now City of Joondalup administration building has been carefully restored and gifted to the Wanneroo Regional Museum for public display.

Designed in the mid-1980s, the coat or arms was removed from the building in June 1998 after the formation of the two new local governments.

Joondalup Mayor Albert Jacob said the heraldry had been part of the City’s history collection but felt it belonged more appropriately in Wanneroo’s regional museum.

“Highly stylised coat of arms may no longer be in vogue, but they are important memorabilia for local history collections,” he said.

“All northern metropolitan local governments – Stirling, Wanneroo and Joondalup – evolved from the Perth Roads Board, established in the early 1870s, before being broken up into shires from 1961.
“This gift symbolises the ongoing collaboration we have with our neighbouring cities.”

The crest in its glory days at the now City of Joondalup administration building.

Wanneroo Mayor Tracey Roberts said she accepted the gift “with a great deal of pride”.

“This gesture is incredibly special and symbolic of the history our two cities share,” she said.

“When the crest was revealed, I felt incredibly emotional, and it was lovely to see the looks on the faces of the City of Wanneroo pioneers and Freemen who were present.”

The coat of arms features a black swan representing WA and an egret representing the water bird life of the area.

The egret holds a digging stick, thought to be the basis for the name Wanneroo, coming from “wanna” meaning digging stick used by Aboriginal women and roo” meaning “the place of”.

The designer, Dr Douglas Sutherland-Bruce, reaffirmed the use of native symbols, including reeds and marsh lands to represent lakes.

“We nearly created some more history with that design because we wanted the motto ‘Not For One But For All’ to also be in the Noongar language but couldn’t get an agreed translation,” he said.

“Maybe somebody can do that now.”

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