Science students soar at Warwick SHS

Warwick Senior High School students Aden Pegler (17), of Marangaroo, and Alana Dooley (16), of Greenwood, will take part in the 40th Harry Messel International Science School. Picture: David Baylis d494298
Warwick Senior High School students Aden Pegler (17), of Marangaroo, and Alana Dooley (16), of Greenwood, will take part in the 40th Harry Messel International Science School. Picture: David Baylis d494298

STUDENTS are soaring when it comes to science at Warwick Senior High School.

This month July, Aden Pegler (17) and Alana Dooley (16) will join a group of 130 students from eight countries heading to Sydney to take part in the 40th Harry Messel International Science School (ISS).

The school runs every two years and is considered one of the best international physics programs for students in the world.

With a rigorous application process, only five students will represent WA.

This year’s theme is Frontier Science with guest speakers including astrophysicist Dame Professor Jocelyn Bell Burnell, NASA flight director Matt Abbott, quantum technology scientist Professor David Reilly and Dr Karl Kruszelnicki.

Jack Eaton, Aden Pegler and Alana Dooley are exceeding in scientific studies. Picture: David Baylis

Aden, who hopes to study data science at Curtin University next year, he said was looking forward to visiting Sydney University.

“ISS provides not only the opportunity to deepen my understanding of physics but also work with students who share similar interests from around the world,” he said.

“I am most looking forward to hearing from Professor David Reilly. He holds a joint position with Microsoft Corporation and the University of Sydney, where he is working to develop the world’s first quantum computer.”

Alana, who is in Year 11 and has set her sights on pursuing studies in astrophysics, said she was most looking forward to hearing from Prof Bell Burnell from Oxford University.

“She is an astrophysicist and in 2018 was awarded the Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics for her discovery of radio pulsars,” she said.

“She donated the prize money ($4.07 million) to fund women, under-represented ethnic minority and refugee students to become physics researchers.”

Meanwhile, 15-year-old Jack Eaton was one of 60 secondary school students from across Australia and New Zealand invited to attend the Youth Australian and New Zealand Association for the Advancement of Science Youth Conference in Adelaide.

Jack Eaton (15), of Greenwood. Picture: David Baylis

The conference gives students the opportunity to visit world-class facilities where research is taking place and meet leading scientists and other young adults who share their passion for science.

While in Adelaide, Jack will visit local universities and research institutes such as the Defence Science and Technology Group, attend talks from noted scientists and undertake hands-on experiments.

“I just like science and it seemed like a really awesome experience: one week of being able to see things you are not usually exposed to,” he said.

Prestigious science camp fun for Warwick student