Shire of Kalamunda planting program tackles erosion at Poison Gully

Matt Crook and Green Army team supervisor Shannon O'Grady planting native sedges in High Wycombe. Picture: David Baylis d459675
Shire of Kalamunda bush care officer Kaye Smith and Ecojobs team leader Rob Ward surrounded by helpers from the Green Army. Picture: David Baylis d459675
Matt Crook and Shannon O'Grady in revegetation work at Poison Gully. Picture: David Baylis d459675
Matt Crook and Green Army team supervisor Shannon O'Grady planting native sedges in High Wycombe. Picture: David Baylis d459675 Shire of Kalamunda bush care officer Kaye Smith and Ecojobs team leader Rob Ward surrounded by helpers from the Green Army. Picture: David Baylis d459675 Matt Crook and Shannon O'Grady in revegetation work at Poison Gully. Picture: David Baylis d459675

A NEW habitat planting strategy has stabilised river banks in the Shire of Kalamunda and stopped erosion.

The Shire of Kalamunda has planted more than 12,000 native sedges in Poison Gully, High Wycombe.

Adding sedges into the channel along Poison Gully aims to stabilise and reduce erosion of the banks, and provide more habitats for insects, frogs, mammals and other wildlife using the waterway.

Shire chief executive Rhonda Hardy said the sedges strategy in spring provided the best chance for growth and reduced the risk of erosion.

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“This site is a real community asset. It is an important wildlife corridor and also contains a threatened ecological community,” Ms Hardy said.

With help from EcoJobs and the Green Army team, the Shire of Kalamunda has undertaken mass plantings of pale rush, knotted club rush and jointed rush sedges along the High Wycombe section of Poison Gully.

Poison Gully and its catchment is in the foothills and the scarp of the Darling Range.

The creek starts in Stirk Park, at the top of Kalamunda Road, and traverses the northernmost section of Mundy Regional Park as it heads west.

Leaving the shire, it flows into Munday Swamp on the Perth Airport site, a significant wetland and Aboriginal heritage site.

The vegetation is described as open woodland of jarrah, marri and banksia with fringing woodland along creek beds of flooded gums and swamp paperbarks.

The site forms a natural buffer between the environment and homes in the region and provides locals with direct access to the natural environment.

Ms Hardy said environmental work to improve and protect Poison Gully was ongoing and any supporters would be welcome.

For more information, call the Shire of Kalamunda on 9257 9999 or email environment@kalamunda.wa. gov.au