Kwinana puts young people in focus for National Youth Week


Elaine Degroot, Pippa Pursell, City of Kwinana youth development manager Vikki Barlow, Joseph Buswell and Yyrone Gulliver with the youth strategy.
Elaine Degroot, Pippa Pursell, City of Kwinana youth development manager Vikki Barlow, Joseph Buswell and Yyrone Gulliver with the youth strategy.

A YOUTH strategy aiming to bring a positive change to young people in Kwinana is set to be launched today as part of the City’s National Youth Week program.

Mayor Carol Adams said the strategy would guide the City’s youth services sector and its partners over the next three years to together help young people of Kwinana with activities and programs.

It is a three-year strategic document that aims to guide the City of Kwinana and partners in working with young people aged 12 to 24.

City youth development manager Vikki Barlow said the strategy aimed to support young people and their families with low-cost, inclusive programs available.

“These programs will focus on building confidence, resilience, self-esteem and wellbeing,” Ms Barlow said.

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“One example of the sectors working together to address youth issues is the youth diversion program ‘Beatball’.

“This program is run by the Nyoongar Wellbeing and Sports, City of Kwinana and Australian Red Cross”.

The strategy was developed following consultation with Kwinana’s young people, parents, caregivers and youth services sector stakeholders.

Some of the service gaps identified in the strategy include housing assistance, and programs addressing anger management, conflict resolution, effective communication and healthy lifestyles.

There were also calls for specialised parenting and family support for Aboriginal and Cultural and Linguistically Diverse communities, and low cost and flexible after-school activities and programs.

The gap analysis also revealed that there was a lack of awareness of what was available to young people in the way of programs and services.