Social issues tackled by new performance, Head Full Of Love

Despite their differences, Tilly Napuljari and Nessa Tavistock realise they have much in common.
Social issues tackled by new performance, Head Full Of Love
Despite their differences, Tilly Napuljari and Nessa Tavistock realise they have much in common.

PEEL Health Campus and Mandurah Performing Arts Centre staff have joined forces to promote the wellbeing of local residents.

The complementary aims are coming together through the performance of Head Full of Love, the story of an unlikely but inspiring friendship which forms between two characters, one white and the other black.

Based around extensive central desert mob consultation and support, this is an unsentimental, humorous and deeply moving portrait of the complexity of cross-cultural relationships rewoven, like a beanie, into a simple and humble beauty.

Head Full of Love invites audiences to see positive reconciliation between an indigenous and non-indigenous person on stage, and along with highlighting some key health issues the play operates with a deep awareness of the social context.

It mirrors genuine reconciliation work being done at the actual Beanie Festival in Alice Springs and makes no apology in advocating for social change.

Based around the themes of this show, MPAC and Peel Health Campus are bringing the community together to knit beanies at Nidjalla Waangan Mia for a good old fashioned knit and knatter, sharing stories and a chance to learn about important health issues.

Peel Health Campus chief executive Margaret Sturdy said the collaboration reflected Ramsay Health Care’s commitment to contribute to the community.

“We are very proud of this healthy and healing partnership,” she said.

“We chose Head Full of Love to partner with as the themes and values of the play sit very deeply with our own organisational values.

“Partnering with this play has given us the opportunity to bring the local community– both indigenous and non-indigenous – together.

“It’s wonderful to be able to open the arts up to the community in such a positive way, highlighting reconciliation and health issues in the process.”