Banning breeds will do little to reduce attacks, says RSPCA

Department of Fire and Emergency Services bushfire and local government relations coordinator Craig Garrett with Georgia Johnson, the first female bushfire volunteer captain for Bullsbrook. d386229
Department of Fire and Emergency Services bushfire and local government relations coordinator Craig Garrett with Georgia Johnson, the first female bushfire volunteer captain for Bullsbrook. d386229

‘There was a case late last year where a six-year-old girl was mauled in Baldivis by five dogs,’ he said.

‘None of those dogs was on the banned dog list.

‘It depends on how the dogs were trained or possibly not trained at all.’

But Minister for Local Government Tony Simpson said NSW statistics show that pit bulls are the breed with the greatest propensity to attack.

Mr Mayne said the best way to reduce dog attacks was through training and socialisation.

‘We often say it is ‘the deed, not the breed’ or another way of saying is ‘don’t blame the breed, blame who is behind the lead’,’ he said.

‘What that means is that RSPCA believes in responsible pet ownership and it is an owner’s responsibility to not only look after the animal’s health and wellbeing but also to ensure the dog has been properly trained and socialised.’

Mr Simpson said the community’s concerns were based on strict provisions in the Victorian legislation. WA’s changes would not mirror Victoria’s changes, he said.

‘In particular, there is no proposed requirement for the destruction of unregistered restricted breeds,’ he said.

‘The proposed penalty for having an unregistered restricted breed in Western Australia is a maximum court-imposed penalty of $10,000.

‘Members of the community deserve protection from dangerous dogs.’