Carnaby’s black cockatoos rear fledgling in Mandurah reserve

Carnaby's Black Cockatoos photographed with an artificial hollow or cocka-tube. Picture: Tony Kirkby
Carnaby's Black Cockatoos photographed with an artificial hollow or cocka-tube. Picture: Tony Kirkby

ENDANGERED Carnaby’s Black Cockatoos have reared a fledgling in a Mandurah reserve.

The birds used an artificial hollow or cocka-tube installed at the instigation of a local community reference group and Friends of the Reserve.

Mandurah Deputy Mayor and environmentalist Caroline Knight said it highlighted the importance of community groups and the significant role they could play in the community and she encouraged people to become involved.

“There are plenty of different ways, whether its helping in the Great Cocky Count or joining the local Friends group,’’ she said.

“Community groups contribute hugely to the richness of Mandurah and their importance should never be underestimated.”

Ms Knight said Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo numbers were in serious decline, listed as endangered and protected by both State and Federal legislation.

The population has declined by 50 per cent and the 2015 Great Cocky Count showed Carnaby’s on the Perth-Peel coastal plain were declining at around 15 per cent a year.

“The fact they have chosen to breed in one of Mandurah’s best reserves is something to be celebrated,’’ she said.

“We have amazingly rich reserves that are home to quenda, long necked turtles, possums, kangaroos, phascogales and a vast number of frog species.”

The cocka-tubes are made by Landcare SJ.

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