Coast climate change

Mayor Paddi Creevey, foreground, with Ron Pearce, Barry Sammels, Tania Jackson, Noel Dew, David Reid, Wally Barrett, David Smith and Murray Scott Picture: Jon Hewson d401297
Mayor Paddi Creevey, foreground, with Ron Pearce, Barry Sammels, Tania Jackson, Noel Dew, David Reid, Wally Barrett, David Smith and Murray Scott Picture: Jon Hewson d401297

The partnership includes coastal cities and shires between Cape Peron near in Rockingham and Cape Naturaliste in Busselton.

It was formed to empower regional communities to reduce risks and optimise opportunities presented by climate change.

The Local Government Areas represent more than 60 per cent of residential buildings at risk of climate change impacts in WA.

The partnership received Federal Government funding to assess potential impacts and show how the nine local governments could respond to coastal hazards arising from climate change-induced sea level rise in the region.

The Coastal Adaptation Decision Pathways project identified that until 2110, erosion was a far more pervasive issue than flooding.

Eight hundred hectares of residential land would be subject to increased flood risk.

An almost 200m-wide strip along the coastline was at risk from erosion, the value of affected assets at risk was about $1.2 billion while $1.1 billion of assets could be protected at a cost of about $120 million.

At the annual general meeting in Mandurah, the partners agreed to delegate the findings to the State Government.

Mandurah Mayor Paddi Creevey said the Peron Naturaliste region was one of the most vulnerable areas in WA to the impacts of climate change and coastal erosion.

‘The City of Mandurah has always wanted to use the most up-to-date science to help prepare for future impacts of climate change and we take these latest findings very seriously,” she said.

The PNP Coastal Community Adaptation Awareness Plan workshop (funded by the WA Department of Planning’s Coastwest initiative) will be held in July.