Cold craft for Royal Show

Cold porcelain flowers, such as the ones pictured above and on the left, will make their debut at this year’s Royal Show.
Cold porcelain flowers, such as the ones pictured above and on the left, will make their debut at this year’s Royal Show.

A South American craft, introduced in the 1970s and taken up in many other countries, cold porcelain creates long-lasting flower displays.

A floral display is made from a paste using cornflour, wood glue and oil. The paste is made in a microwave or on the top of a cooker and air dried. It is put into a mould and can be painted.

Ms Tyrer is from Chile, where cold porcelain was very popular.

Despite not trying cold porcelain in Chile, she became interested in the craft through a friend.

�Once in Australia I started making my flowers in small sizes and creating brooches that I would sell at a pharmacy in Sydney,� Ms Tyrer said.

�I spent long hours making these flowers, while listening to talk back radio to get used to the Australian accent.�

Ms Tyrer was a dentist in Chile and had to re-train when she came to Australia.

�I needed some way to keep my hands working on fine and fiddly things,� she said.

�This cold porcelain proved quite good.

�In Australia, I learnt clay sculpture, painting, felting and spinning, while always coming back to the flowers.

�I dreamt of the day I could teach people how to make these flowers.�

Ms Tyrer has been teaching cold porcelain to a group of women at Murray Arts and Crafts.

Visit coldporcelainflowers.com.au.