Dwellingup blacksmith overwhelemed with response after prized 1835 anvil was stolen


Carl MacMillan, who teaches blacksmithing, lost a prized anvil and other equipment in a robbery.
Carl MacMillan, who teaches blacksmithing, lost a prized anvil and other equipment in a robbery.

DWELLINGUP blacksmith Carl MacMillan has been overwhelmed and his faith in human nature somewhat restored by the dozens of phone calls and offers he received since his prized 1835 anvil was stolen from his workshop.

The master blacksmith has received more than half a dozen offers – donated or loaned or in some case for sale – of anvils and other items.

But to replace some of the items, Mr MacMillan needs to get some money together and will be forced to sell the beloved Triumph motor cycle he has owned for more than 17 years.

Mill Studio, his workshop in the old railways yards outside the former logging town, was one of the few buildings that survived the 1961 Dwellingup fires.

But the popular blacksmithing classes he conducts from his workshop are unlikely to survive after the theft of his precious anvil, two other anvils and various sledgehammers and hammers that have “stolen” his livelihood, he says.

The only blacksmith offering tuition in WA will no longer be available.

Mr Macmillan has been a blacksmith for more than 20 years

His classes, provided through the Dwellingup Forest Heritage Centre, have been very popular and he has taught more than 30 students this year alone.

Mr MacMillan started out as a welder and spent three years carrying out restoration work in the UK with English heritage houses.

Examples of his work can be seen on the roundabouts at Dolphin Quay and the pelican on Leslie Street.

“I’m really gutted but somehow I will bounce back,’’ he said.