Mandurah Black Cockatoo workshop a hit


Black Cockatoo workshop participants.
Black Cockatoo workshop participants.

MORE than 20 people keen to protect and create environments for the iconic Black Cockatoos attended a free workshop at Marlee Reserve, Mandurah.

The workshop was delivered by the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council in partnership with the City of Mandurah and Birdlife WA.

PHCC’s project manager Thelma Crook said the workshop linked to the Rivers 2 Ramsar project’s objectives of connecting river corridors for healthier landscapes.

“Our workshop covered the need for wildlife corridors,stepping stones such as reserves and remnant bushland, and linkages that provide the cockatoos with habitat, breeding areas and food sources,” she said.

“We also looked at the significance of urban habitats such as backyards, watering pointsand local reserves and touched on the impacts of climate change on these iconic birds,” she said.

Participant Charlotte Jones said she attended to learn more about her favourite bird species.

“They taught us about the differences between the three species of Black Cockatoos, their calls, feeding habits and behaviours, as well as about artificial nesting boxes,” she said.

For more information on how you can be involved visit birdlife