Mandurah locals embracing the pin-up culture of yesteryear


Pin-up enthusiast Abbey Humble, of
Dudley Park.
Picture: Philip J Bedingfield and makeup: Ash Sadler
Pin-up enthusiast Abbey Humble, of Dudley Park. Picture: Philip J Bedingfield and makeup: Ash Sadler

DITA Von Teese says pin-up is “not about seducing men, it is about embracing womanhood”.

Ladies involved in the local retro revival are certainly embracing their womanhood.

These women are immersing themselves in a bygone era through pin-up culture.

Women in the 1940s and 1950s were encouraged to look immaculate and be the perfect wife for their husband.

While such conservatism might seem far removed from modern women, Dita said pin-up girls embraced aspects from the era and turned it into their strength.

Dudley Park 22-year-old Abbey Humble said pin-up made her feel empowered, as well as feminine and beautiful.

“Women can be sexy without wearing next to nothing,” she said.

“Pin-up says we are women; we are not the weaker sex.”

Abbey, who is a waitress at The Stage Door Restaurant, said she always got noticed when she wore pin-up in Mandurah.

“I try to wear pin-up when I go out, whether it’s to dinner or the movies,” she said.

“It can take about two hours to get ready.

“But I always get noticed and compliments.”

Abbey is a member of the Pretty as a Pinup Facebook group, which was started by Rockingham’s Joanna Illescas Timms (aka Pocket Rocket Betty).

The group encourages women to be strong, support each other and flaunt their feminine wiles.