Mandurah residents can now get hearing and eyesight check in one spot

Audiologist Jieun Park checks out Minister Ken Wyatt's hearing watched by the clinic's first customer Morwenna de Luis (left).
Audiologist Jieun Park checks out Minister Ken Wyatt's hearing watched by the clinic's first customer Morwenna de Luis (left).

ONLY one third of people with hearing loss do something about it.

And those that do take between seven and 10 years to acknowledge their deafness and seek help.

Now there is no excuse with the launch of the first SpecSavers Audiology clinic today at Mandurah Forum where customers can check their hearing and eyesight at the same time.

The first in a new network of clinics was launched by Federal Minister for the Aged Ken Wyatt.

Mr Wyatt said about one in six people or about 3.6 million Australians were affected by hearing loss, a figure expected to grow to one in four by 2050.

He said complete or partial deafness could rob people of their independence, learning capacity, employment opportunities, participation in community life and the ability to socialise and communicate.

“A recent report estimated the economic and social cost of hearing loss to the nation runs into billions of dollars each year,’’ he said.

”In the past year, we have invested more than half a billion dollars in the program and have been able to help more than 700,000 Australian to hear better.”

SpecSavers plans a network of around 200 centres.

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