Peel region a blaze of colour as wildflowers bloom


Some of the wildflowers seen around Mandurah and Waroona.
Kairi Hay-Steward looks for flowers in Beacham Reserve.
Peel region a blaze of colour as wildflowers bloom
Peel region a blaze of colour as wildflowers bloom
Peel region a blaze of colour as wildflowers bloom
Peel region a blaze of colour as wildflowers bloom
Peel region a blaze of colour as wildflowers bloom
Some of the wildflowers seen around Mandurah and Waroona. Kairi Hay-Steward looks for flowers in Beacham Reserve.

NATURE reserves in Mandurah and the Peel region are blooming marvellous right now as the area experiences a bumper wildflower season.

Curtin University Professor Kingsley Dixon is a botanist, WA Scientist of the Year and happens to live in Waroona.

Prof Dixon said it was a big year to go bushwalking.

“This year there have been the most brilliant rains,” he said.

“It’s getting close to the average rainfall and they’ve been beautifully spaced.”

Prof Dixon said the recent fires through the Peel region also means that rare orchids will be flowering.

“There are orchids that only flower after a fire,” he said.

“But people should only go into areas that are safe.”

He said people can spot Donkey orchids, which have ears like a donkey.

Enamel orchids – with petals that look like they’ve been painted.

The wattles look like postcards, according to Prof Dixon.

“The buds on the jarrah mean it will be a fantastic season for honey,” he said.

“I’ve been watching some spider orchids on my property for years because they’re really rare.

“But I’ve caged them because there are rabbits”

Prof Dixon advised people not to plan long walks “because you’ll be constantly stopping” to look at the flowers.

He said that bushwalkers should be careful not to trample the flowers and “don’t pick them”.

The Blue Lady and the Yellow Cowslip orchids hold the distinction of being the bluest and yellowiest in the world.

Prof Dixon said the next few weekends were the perfect time to get the family together for a picnic and head into the bush.

“If you find an orchid and talk to your kids about them in a fascinating way, you’ll get them hooked,” he said.

“Understand that walking in the WA bush, everything you see only grows here and nowhere else on earth.”

Visit http://www.visitpeel.com.au/wildflower-season for more.