Sistahood Rising is coming to Fairbridge

Tracy McFie & Larissa O'Neill. Photographer: Jon Hewson.
Tracy McFie & Larissa O'Neill. Photographer: Jon Hewson.

WOMEN have been pit against each other for far too long and now is the time to support and celebrate one another, says Wyld Tribe Sistahood co-creator Larissa O’Neill.

Together with “soulsista” Tracy McFie (Meelon), Ms O’Neill is bringing one of WA’s biggest over-18s women only events to Fairbridge next month to encourage love and acceptance.

Sistahood Rising is a three-day, two-night “sleepover with soul” festival from November 2-4 where women can come together and take part in more than 50 experiential workshops.

Presented by 30 women from around Australia, the workshops include trance dance, yoga, visualisation and meditation, holistic health and wellness, and moon song and chant.

Ms O’Neill said the intention for Wyld Tribe, based in Mandurah, and the Sistahood Rising was to gather like-minded and open-hearted women in celebration of one another’s uniqueness and wildness.

“Our sistafest’s inception came about as we recognised the need for the women of Western Australia to gather as a community in ‘sacred sistahood’ to celebrate all that is to be a woman,” she said.

“We create a safe space where women gather, chant, dance, explore, have expansive and deep conversation long into the evening or as the sun rises.

“Space where tears and laughter are exchanged, where you are seen for who you are, no need for a mask, no judgment, no trying to ‘fix’ you, just love and acceptance.”

Ms O’Neill said the “safe sacred space” has been designed to gently bring “nervousness and expectation” and even fear to the fore for women to release it.

“It’s a space for each woman to find her way back to self, to who she is at her very core, woman, first and foremost,” she said.

“Then we begin the healing process, understanding that we really all want for the same things, happiness, health and love.

“When we begin to really feel this within our selves, we can then look at other women (and men) through the eyes of unity.”

Ms O’Neill said events such as Sistahood Rising were important to lead the way for women to support each other, without competition, and to genuinely believe in and support each other.

“Women have been pit against one another for far too long,” she said.

“The ideals which are so unrealistic have segregated us and pulled down into a spiral of self-hatred and suspicion.

“The only way to truly live in authenticity is to heal that tear in the feminine tapestry and that begins one woman at a time.”

For more information, a list of workshops and tickets, visit the website at Sistahood Rising.