Women learn to ecodye at Contemporary Arts Space Mandurah eco garden

Louise Helfgott, Bev Jackson and Jill Millican check out the results of their ecodyeing efforts.
Louise Helfgott, Bev Jackson and Jill Millican check out the results of their ecodyeing efforts.

WOMEN learned how to ecodye at a workshop at Mandurah’s cultural eco garden this week, creating colours and patterns on paper and cloth using simple techniques.

The Contemporary Arts Space Mandurah eco garden was established in November, planned by community volunteers and supported by the City of Mandurah.

The garden showcases local native plants that have traditional Noongar significance for foods, medicines or tools, that are of interest for ecodyeing, fibre arts and contemporary bush tucker.

It is designed to educate residents and visitors about the diverse flora of the region, Mandurah’s rich indigenous history and contemporary uses of endemic plants.

Garden manager Helen Coleman is one of the artists in residence at Contemporary Arts Space Mandurah and has been using the experience to explore the ecodye potential of local plants.

Ms Coleman received funding last year from the City of Mandurah 2017 Creative Mandurah grant program to run the Colours of Manjoogoordap project where she worked with Barb Pickett and the Koolbardies Talking Group to explore the colours that could be created from plants with local Noongar significance.

She also runs regular sessions in the garden where home schooled families and the public can share garden tasks and learning activities.

Ms Coleman will run a free ecodyeing session for the public at the community garden as part of the Stretch Festival on May 5-6.

MORE: Perth Children’s Hospital set for May 14 opening

MORE: WA Police charge four people following shooting at shopping centre

MORE: Police call on community to target graffiti 

MORE: One man dead, two injured in Dwellingup crash