You can count on these birdwatchers


On the lookout... Bill Howard, Barbara Sing, Jaci Dimmack and Astrid Gwynn.
On the lookout... Bill Howard, Barbara Sing, Jaci Dimmack and Astrid Gwynn.

Members of the community, tertiary institutions and agency staff recorded up to 60,000 migratory and resident shorebirds, including those that had flown from as far as Siberia.

Birdlife WA Peel Branch and the Peel-Harvey Catchment Council (PHCC) co-ordinated the count across 17 different sites, covering 26,000 hectares of the Peel Yalgorup system’s Ramsar-listed Wetlands.

PHCC chairman Andy Gulliver said the count was an essential part of maintaining the globally recognised Ramsar listing of the region’s Wetlands.

“The Shorebird 2020 program provides reliable data on shorebird populations,” he said.

“The results have showed our region is important on a global level and this led to the listing of the local Peel-Yalgorup wetlands under the Ramsar convention.

“The volunteers – many of whom have committed to the count for a number of years now – are a key component of this.”

Birdlife WA Peel Branch/Mandurah Bird Observers convener Bob Paterson the local group was one of the few groups that had consistent data on shorebirds.

“This data is used by the Department of Fisheries, Parks and Wildlife and others to help develop strategies,” he said.