Unique History Lost in Mandurah

THE City of Mandurah Council prides itself on how it is a conservation council, yet it is going to destroy two of the last pieces of Mandurah history and tourist attractions – the old wooden bridge and Sutton Farmhouse.

The bridge is probably the only one in WA, and maybe Australia, that was constructed with complete tree trunks brought down from Dwellingup and driven into the riverbed, and then others laid as the crossbeams.

The only cut timber was used for the floorings, railings and landings.

This makes it unique and it should be preserved for this fact alone.

Tourists come to Mandurah to take photographs of it, just as they go to Busselton and photograph its long jetty.

If council really wants to move more traffic, then spend the money on building another three-lane bridge beside the present Estuary Bridge.

This way, the traffic flows safely and freely, and some time in the future, the third lane on each bridge can be used for the railway line that will go down the coast, eventually to Bunbury.

Sutton Farmhouse is an open space, letting tourists walk around the farmhouse and workers’ huts. With the big trees, it makes an ideal place to have a picnic.

But the city council wants to allow more high-rise buildings to be built on some of this open space, thus spoiling the effectiveness of the Farmhouse precinct.

You only have to look at Hall Cottage to see how squeezed up it looks. Instead of building more high-rise, the council should be beautifying this area and making it a big attraction to complement Hall Cottage.

Come on city council: if you truly believe in conservation, then save these icons of Mandurah.

KEVIN FOWLER, Mandurah.

n Editor’s note: The Sutton Farmhouse development is still a proposal on which council has yet to vote. The proposal is out for public comment.