Alfred Cove Wave Park: environmental assessment available to be viewed online

A false impression
A false impression

AN ENVIRONMENTAL assessment of the proposed wave park at Alfred Cove is available for public scrutiny until January 18 after it was posted online.

Wave Park Group (WPG), the team behind the $25 million Urbnsurf project at Tompkins Park, flagged in December it was close to submitting its commissioned report to the WA Environmental Protection Authority (EPA).

The 84-page document – which looks into possible impacts on the river, land, water and people – went live on the EPA’s website Thursday.

It found it “will not have any direct or indirect negative impacts on the ecological values of Tompkins Park or the Alfred Cove Nature Reserve”.

With those finding likely to come under intense scrutiny from sections of the public, Wave Park Group (WPG) chairman Andrew Ross said his team was aiming for transparency with its “self-referral to the EPA”.

“We have stated all along that the community should reserve judgement on the project and sit on the fence until we had completed the technical study work to demonstrate the project was suitable for Tompkins Park,” he said.

“Well, we have done that now, and the report which has been prepared by various experts in their respective fields concludes that the project will not have any direct or indirect impacts on any ecological values, including birds, other fauna, native flora, the Swan River, or any other sensitive environmental receptor.”

The EPA will use this stage of the “proposal assessment process” to consider whether it needs to conduct its own review.

While not wanting to pre-judge what the EPA would conclude, Mr Ross said WPG was hopeful the report would satisfy any arguments put forward by those against the build on environmental grounds.

He was buoyed by Urbnsurf Sydney receiving development approval from the NSW Government in December after proponents were able to address environmental concerns.

“There are no environmental receptors of that order of significance at the Tompkins Park site,” he said.

Melville Mayor Russell Aubrey said the self referral was a bold move and showed confidence on the part of the proponents.

But he added all factors would of course need to satisfy the State Government for the project to proceed and for the council to back its progression.

“If it’s not environmentally sound, the City wouldn’t support it,” he said.

To view the report, visit

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