Climate of change waits for scholarship winner

Professor Benjamin Reilly, Dean of Murdoch University’s School of Public Policy and International Affairs, scholarship winner Claire Smith and former Murdoch University vice-chancellor Mal Nairn.
Professor Benjamin Reilly, Dean of Murdoch University’s School of Public Policy and International Affairs, scholarship winner Claire Smith and former Murdoch University vice-chancellor Mal Nairn.

The Sir Walter Murdoch School masters student is the inaugural winner of a scholarship that will give her the opportunity to meet Australian leaders in Canberra and then travel to Paris for COP21, the United Nations� international conference on climate change.

Ms Smith works for the City of Perth�s economic development unit, which oversees international relations.

Before that, she worked for the US State Department as a political advisor to the US Consul General in Perth.

�I am determined to make Murdoch and Australia proud and I feel I have a lot to offer the Australian team,� Ms Smith said.

�This scholarship is an amazing opportunity to begin working on important issues related to climate change such as creative ways in which countries can work together to foster sustainable development.

�It will be inspiring to hear first-hand from brilliant minds and dedicated activists changing the course of global efforts to fight climate change.�

Ms Smith said she was interested in how developing countries could find synergies and mutually beneficial partnerships that would promote sustainable development.

�In the future I would love to contribute to policy development as a consultant for government or in government affairs.�

Murdoch School of Public Policy and International Affairs Dean Professor Benjamin Reilly said the Mal and Karyl Nairn Global Voices Scholarship would give students the chance to complete their degree at a global level of decision-making.

�Claire had to undergo a merit-based selection to be chosen and her journey with Global Voices will involve some serious preparation,� Professor Reilly said.

�The experience starts in Canberra with meetings with politicians and civil servants in government, the opposition and in Federal Parliament, before heading to Paris as part of an international delegation, working closely with Australian government officials.

�This experience will be a game-changer for Claire, the contacts she makes will be invaluable and possibly life-changing.�