Cost of Melville Civic Centre repairs blow out because of health and safety concerns

City of Melville.
City of Melville.

THE cost to repair cladding and tiling at the City of Melville’s Civic Centre has been pushed up because the work has to be completed outside business hours.

An amount of $150,000 will be allocated to project, following a mid-year budget review adopted by Council on March 20.

A budget document said works had to be completed out of hours due to the location and nature of the work, “considerably” increasing the cost.

Chief executive Shayne Silcox said the work would involve noisy, moving machinery in a live working environment, meaning it was a measure that had to be taken.

“As the safety of staff and public will be paramount, these will need to be completed outside of normal working hours for occupational safety and health reasons,” he said.

Work will be finished in 2018-19.

The additional money was included in the City’s half-year budget check under a list of capital works projects requiring funding amendments.

Also included was an extra $175,000 for the City’s Urban Forest project, which is a long-term look at the management of trees in the City’s parks, streets and neighbourhoods.

Mr Silcox said the money would go towards collecting data on the City’s trees, planting projects, community engagement events and the development of educational material.

“In the long term, the management of the City’s green space will enable residents and visitors to the City to connect with nature, increasing their physical and mental health,” he said.

An additional $120,0000 was needed for detailed design costs for a development of Heathcote’s lower land.

Dr Silcox said the plan was to build something that complements the existing facilities at Heathcote Reserve, with features including green space, paths, public art and interpretive pieces, seating, shelters and connection to the established area.

“Once completed the lower land will provide increased usable public open space for the broader community and a greater link to the river from the upper land and will complement and extend the park area associated with Heathcote Reserve,” he said.

A further $100,000 was also needed to cover repairs to LeisureFit Booragoon’s 25m pool.

The City did have a couple of wins, with external funding coming in for repairs to Mt Pleasant’s Reynolds Road ($469,933) and Garling Street ($150,867) in Willagee.

Path projects on Kinross Road in Applecross and Barling Crescent in Bateman came in under budget by $51,291 and $65,095.

The City of Melville’s mid-year budget review was passed by council last week.

Adopted unopposed, the City’s financial position at the end of December was on par with projections in its 2017-18 budget.

To square the books, $255,000 from a 2016-17 surplus of $3.03 million was used to balance negative variances across both operating and capital budgets.

About $2.52m of that surplus will be put into the City of Melville’s rates equalisation reserve, which is used to reduce the need to increase future rates and meet any shortfalls identified during budget reviews.

City of Melville’s mid-year budget review – significant capital works budget amendments:

Repairs to leisure pool at LeisureFit Booragoon (-$100,000).
Civic Centre – external cladding (-$100,000).
Civic Centre – tiling and weather-proofing (-$50,000).
Relocation of Civic Library (-$55,000).
Urban Forest Project (-$175,000).
Detailed design for Heathcote lower lands (-$120,000).
Kinross Road path completed under budget (+$51,291).
Bartling Crescent path completed under budget (+$65,095).
Palmyra Primary School and Zenobia Street footpath (-$72,000).
Grant for Murdoch Drive bicycle network (+$109,000).
Heathcote playground renewal (-$90,000).
Reynolds Road upgrades (-$156,450).
Grant funding for Reynolds Road upgrade (+$469,933).
Marmion Street upgrades (-$240,218).
Honour Avenue-Point Walter Road upgrades completed under budget (+$74,386).
Camm Avenue upgrades (-$117,701).
Anglesey Drive upgrades (-$82,451).
Grant funding for Garling Street upgrade (+$150,867).
Roads To Recovery grant 2017-18 (+$330,285).