Council voices concerns over another high-rise tower

An artist's impression of Canning Beach Promenade.
An artist's impression of Canning Beach Promenade.

THE Melville council have again shown their disdain for a high-rise tower in Applecross, voicing their concern with a proposed 15-storey development.

Edge Visionary Living’s $121 million, 224-apartment complex titled Canning Beach Promenade did not find favour with the councillors at a special council meeting on November 28.

The council voted against endorsing its own City officer’s recommendation to the Metro Central Joint Development Assessment Panel (JDAP) that it approves the development on the corner of Canning Beach Road and Moreau Mews.

The panel is expected to meet on Wednesday, December 11 to make a decision on the high-rise tower, which is situated in the 10-storey that allows for further heights provided developers can show community benefits.

Among the council’s reasons for not supporting the development were the community benefits not being proportionate to the proposed storeys, the impact of the development on the foreshore area and Canning Bridge and that it was actually 16-storeys.

Among the features of the proposed development is a common podium design at the base of the towers is made up of a ground floor and two more levels on the 6431sqm site.

A look inside the propose development.

There are large gaps between the towers to promote “view corridors” for neighbouring developments.

The north western tower is setback about 17m from the boundary which borders the residential area.

There are 335 residential car parking bays and the same amount of bike bays.

The development will include five food and beverage tenancies, public changing infrastructure and 640sqm of community facilities including a resources centre which will be handed over to the City of Melville.

A realignment of Canning Beach Road would be needed as part of the project.

Another angle on the proposed development.

Edge Visionary Living executive director Gavin Hawkins previously said it felt the development served two purposes.

“Firstly providing a new premium level of lifestyle and accommodation to Applecross buyers that has not existed to date,” he said.

“Secondly and just as importantly we are looking to revitalise and enhance an important riverside precinct in Applecross.

“We were conscious of not simply create an exclusive residential enclave cut-off from the community, but to build an integrated development.”

Mr Hawkins said some of the other community benefits would be disabled facilities, a $500,000 community art contribution, health spa and kayak hire.