Diabetes diagnosis was a life changer

John Baines with wife Annabel and sons Fletcher and Charlie.
John Baines with wife Annabel and sons Fletcher and Charlie.

The Leeming father of two was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 29 and, like many with the disease, he had to make some drastic life changes.

�The way I describe it is that I now have some strict rules I need to live by, which mainly revolve around what I eat and how to use insulin to keep my blood sugar levels under control,� Mr Baines said.

�These aren�t hard rules to live by, but they can�t be ignored or taken lightly either; to be blunt, I preferred the freedom I had before I was diagnosed and I�d love to get that back.�

Mr Baines volunteers his time to help lay out the e-newsletter for Diabetes Research WA in support of the charity�s groundbreaking work.

The 42-year-old is urging all West Australians to support diabetes research ahead of Diabetes Week, which runs from July 12 to 18.

�I want to change the rules for me and everyone else with diabetes,� he said.

�That will only be possible if researchers make a breakthrough in managing or curing diabetes so I�d love people to consider donating to this important cause.�

Diabetes Research WA executive director Sherl Westlund said the organisation needed ongoing support and urged people to consider becoming part of the group�s regular giving program.

�Our local researchers are on the brink of some incredible breakthroughs, with one team investigating a protein which appears to reduce diet-induced obesity and type 2 diabetes,� Ms Westlund said.

�Researchers are also looking to develop a test that could indicate a person�s chances of developing type-one diabetes and what types of complications they might expect.

�Even $20 a month gives our researchers the best chance of taking their discoveries from the laboratory and into people�s lives.�

Mr Baines and Ms Westlund will be guest speakers at the National Diabetes Week conference.