Fiona Stanley Hospital delivers good news to mother after surgery


Fiona Stanley Hospital midwifery manager Diana Player, obstetrics and gynaecology head Dr Gargeswari Sunanda, Damian and Michelle Day and baby Reece.
Fiona Stanley Hospital midwifery manager Diana Player, obstetrics and gynaecology head Dr Gargeswari Sunanda, Damian and Michelle Day and baby Reece.

A DARWIN mother whose placenta had grown through the uterus to her bladder was flown to Fiona Stanley Hospital to safely deliver her baby last month.

Michelle Day was diagnosed with the rare pregnancy complication known as placenta percreta 35 weeks into her pregnancy when an ultrasound and MRI showed the abnormality.

She was given two days to pack up her family and move to Perth, where interventional radiology was available.

Mrs Day said she had three “perfect pregnancies” followed by caesareans before falling pregnant with Reece, giving her a 2.13 per cent chance of placenta percreta due to the thinning of the uterus.

The condition is potentially life-threatening and some women require a hysterectomy to control heavy bleeding.

A large team was mobilised under Dr Gargeswari Sunanda and after a series of meetings Mrs Day spent four hours awake in surgery preparation before unexpectedly going into labour on the table.

“I was absolutely petrified,” she said.

The best-case scenario given to her before surgery was to be in ICU for at least a day and have part of her bladder removed.

But amazingly, the placenta naturally fell away from the bladder, leaving it intact.

A balloon was inflated in the artery that supplies the uterus to reduce blood flow immediately after birth, and stents had been inserted to protect the delicate tubes from the kidneys in the event of a massive bleed.

Reece was delivered via caesarean on August 15 at 37 weeks gestation. He spent 18 hours in the nursery to monitor his breathing but was otherwise healthy.