Fiona Stanley Hospital in prostate cancer first


Prostate cancer patient Neville Franklin (centre) with FSH Head of Urology Dickon Hayne and Cynthia Hawks from the FSH Clinical Trials Program.
Prostate cancer patient Neville Franklin (centre) with FSH Head of Urology Dickon Hayne and Cynthia Hawks from the FSH Clinical Trials Program.

IN an Australian first, Fiona Stanley Hospital (FSH) has begun a new clinical trial aimed at reducing the pain and anxiety associated with prostate biopsies.

Currently men undergoing a prostate biopsy receive only local anaesthetic.

The trial will determine whether the addition of inhaled pain relief is effective in further reducing the discomfort of the procedure.

Prostate biopsies are necessary to diagnose prostate cancer and decide on the most appropriate treatment.

Head of Urology at FSH Dickon Hayne said with more than 1900 men diagnosed with prostate cancer annually in WA alone, it was important to try and minimise anxiety and discomfort for men at every stage of the cancer journey.

“Though a local anaesthetic for prostate biopsy is usually very well tolerated, some men do find the procedure uncomfortable,” Professor Hayne said.

“This clinical trial is looking at whether the addition of inhaled pain relief can improve the experience for men who require prostate biopsy,” he said.

FSH patient Neville Franklin, 63, from Exmouth, was the first patient in Australia to join the trial.

Patients on the double blind trial do not know if they have been given the drug or a placebo.

Researchers aim to include more than 400 men in the trial, which is expected to run over the next 18 months to 2 years.