Garden City: families determined to sock it to sarcoma

Glenn Hall and Mandy Basson are keen to raise awareness of sarcoma, a highly aggressive cancer.
Glenn Hall and Mandy Basson are keen to raise awareness of sarcoma, a highly aggressive cancer.

A PERTH charity will be putting the spotlight on sarcoma – a group of highly aggressive cancers that affect primary bone and soft tissue – in Booragoon later this month.

Sock it to Sarcoma co-ordinator Mandy Basson will be at Garden City Shopping Centre on Thursday, June 22 during WA Sarcoma Awareness Week to help ensure people know the early warning signs of the disease.

The rare form of cancer claimed the life of her daughter Abbie in 2011 at the age of 20.

“As she did her best to fight it, she was inspired to set up Sock it to Sarcoma, to raise awareness and fund new research into it, so that’s what I dedicate much of my life to now,” she said.

“It’s a hugely important mission because the early signs of this cancer can often be dismissed as other things, such as sports injuries, which can mean delays in diagnosis and treatment and that can reduce the chances of beating it.”

More than 350 West Australians are diagnosed with sarcoma every year and 20 percent of cases affect people aged under 18.

Perth improvisation consultancy Just Improvise is also helping Sock it to Sarcoma’s mission, supporting the charity through its fundraising season of Theatresports, taking place every Sunday in June in Mt Claremont.

The group was inspired to help after recently losing a family member, Golden Bay’s Jordan Hay-Hendry, to sarcoma at the age of 23.

“One of our key aims is to help people become familiar with the most common symptoms because sarcoma is aggressive – it has a 40 percent mortality rate within five years, making early detection absolutely critical,” Just Improvise’s Glenn Hall said.

MORE: parents caught off guard by out-of-school-hours care closure

MORE: Perth teacher named Australia’s sexiest vegan

MORE: Perth Modern School Campaign Group welcomes turnaround on moving school to CBD high-rise