Insight into culture

Winthrop PS Year 5s Remy Wegner, Jamie Tan and Brian Clarke with dancers Tony Ganambarr, Shae Duncan, Rodney Beatty (front) and Heather and Edwin Burarrwana.
Winthrop PS Year 5s Remy Wegner, Jamie Tan and Brian Clarke with dancers Tony Ganambarr, Shae Duncan, Rodney Beatty (front) and Heather and Edwin Burarrwana.

The show focuses on the culture of the Yolngu people, who have been making music and sharing stories longer than almost anyone else on the planet.

Through collaboration with the National Aboriginal Islander Skills Development Association, members of the D�tiwuy clan group and support from Rio Tinto, the three-week tour will visit more than 4000 students at 25 primary schools.

It kicked off at Winthrop Primary School last week and will travel to Warnbro, Mosman Park, Tapping, Ballajura, Darch, Kensington, Como, Claremont, Doubleview, Wembley Downs, Wembley, Rossmoyne, Karrinyup, Innaloo, Melville, Roebourne, Karratha, Baynton West, Tom Price and Paraburdoo.

Musica Viva business development director of education Colette Vella said each live performance was accompanied by digital resources and a professional development program for teachers tailored to the Australian curriculum.

�With the help of these learning resources, students develop an awareness of the importance of music, dance and story in Yolngu culture, the traditional roles of ceremony and the process of upholding and passing on these traditions to the next generation,� she said.

Musica Viva is a not-for-profit organisation bringing music to classrooms since 1981.