Residents divided over diversions

Gairloch Street residents John Corser and Mark Fowler collected 570 signatures protesting against the diversions which, they claim, have shifted the issue deeper into Applecross.

Representing Macrae Road residents, Ross Stuart submitted a 310-signature petition in support of making the trial diversions permanent.

Mr Corser said the diversions were neither effective nor appropriate when considering the entire suburb.

“The trial barriers have reduced the problem on Macrae Road but created new problems in at least four or more other streets, including Gairloch, Glenelg, Munro and Macdonald, where both local and non-local traffic has been diverted,” he said.

Both men believe the diversions also fly in the face of the WA Planning Commission’s State Planning Strategy 2050 and Liveable Neighbourhoods policy.

They specifically cited breaches to principles such as avoiding the division of communities, ensuring a movement network that facilitates safe and efficient access to education sites, and ensuring that communities are able to access jobs and services easily, safely and efficiently.

“We’re looking for a win-win for Applecross residents that avoids pitting residents in one area against another and is based on the principles of stopping the peak hour rat-running while still allowing the flow of local traffic during non-peak times,” he said.”

Mr Stuart emphasised that rat-running was not just a Macrae Road issue and that he had canvassed people living on a number of nearby streets.

“The residents on Jane, Ullapool and Reynolds were particularly vocal as they are the favourite re-entry roads back to Canning Highway,” he said.

“A common complaint from locals we spoke to was not being able to get out of your driveway.”

The issue is due to come before the Melville council at its next meeting on March 15.