Something to sing about: Palmyra resident pens song in support of Alfred Cove wave park


Palmyra resident Brad Fraser has penned a tune supporting the proposed wave park.
Palmyra resident Brad Fraser has penned a tune supporting the proposed wave park.

TIRED of the negativity surrounding the proposed Alfred Cove wave park, Palmrya resident Brad Fraser has given voice to what he believes is the view of the silent majority.

The keen surfer and father to two young daughters penned a song outlining his support for the project, which was posted earlier this week on the Perth Surf Park Supporters Facebook page.

“If you haven’t surfed before, please be open to these plans,” the ditty implores.

“It won’t affect your house price or your million dollar views, that’s just bulls**t,” Mr Fraser continues – presumably with one eye firmly on the nearby residents opposed to the facility.

Mr Fraser said he felt motivated to write the song after witnessing some of the backlash against the controversial project.

“Everyone is entitled to their own opinion but I just wanted to create some positive chatter and put forward the view that I think is held by the majority, who are all for the wave park,” he said.

“Obviously the environment comes first but if it passes all the proper checks I’m definitely all for it.

“Perth is a place that has limited surf, and the surf park will create constant, regular waves without any danger of sharks.

“It’ll help get kids outside and off their phones and computer games and instead of having to wait for winter we’ll be able to surf year-round.”

Mr Fraser urged anyone supportive of the wave park to share the song, which finishes with a nod to Oasis hit Don’t Look Back in Anger.

“There’s not much left to say, just don’t look back in anger, it’s a positive thing you w****r, don’t look back in anger, if you don’t get your way.”

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