Past damage done

WHILE I sympathise with Krista Price in last week’s edition over her concerns over the destruction of native fauna habitat, a little bit of research may have provided some credibility to her argument.

The very small area of vegetation that is to be affected by the Roe 8 project should be compared to previous destruction of vast tracts of nearby natural and plantation bushland in recent decades.

Its removal barely raised a peep from so-called environmentalists.

In recent times, vast tracts of banksia groves surrounding Jandakot airport were lost when the airport was privatised. Then Premier Carmen Lawrence had declared some areas to be heritage listed but there was no complaint from her when the bulldozers moved in.

In addition, a dense plantation of mature pine trees once covered the entire suburbs of Winthrop, Murdoch, Kardinya and Murdoch University. Some scattered groves remain.

This plantation attracted thousands of black cockatoos annually for their breeding season. As a young lad from my home in Bicton, I recall the sky going dark as massive flocks of these birds flew overhead on a south-east course to the pine forest.

The screeching was deafening as they passed and could be heard for a few minutes before they could be seen, such was the magnificent size, sight and sound of this annual event.

As for protecting the “wetlands”, most of the year they should be called “slightly moist lands”.

The suburban sprawl and the drain on the Jandakot mound are causing more destruction to the local natural habitat than a dozen freeways through the area would ever accomplish.

Cockburn council also seems to forget when it dumped hundreds of tonnes of toxic and other waste into the landfill site dredged into the southern end of Bibra Lake.

Now it hitches its wagon to Senator Ludlam’s morally outraged circus.

DARYL BINNING, Winthrop.