Bellevue: City of Swan to investigate saving Darling Range Hotel

Bellevue: City of Swan to investigate saving Darling Range Hotel

CITY of Swan councillors passed a motion calling on the City to investigate the purchase of the Darling Range Hotel in Bellevue.

Councillor Ian Johnston raised the motion at the council meeting, which requested the City prepare a report for the Swan Development Committee on the feasibility and desirability of purchasing the hotel as part of the City’s commercialisation policy.

Bellevue Residents and Ratepayers Association secretary Dianne Arvino said she believed the building had heritage value and was one of the oldest hotels left in the area.

“The Bellevue East Land Use Study is a plan adopted by the City of Swan, which we believe compares to the Midland Oval Plan adopted by the City,” she said.

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“We do not believe it is unrealistic to request an interim purchase by City of Swan of the three lots on the corner of Great Eastern Highway and Horace Street, to protect the historic Darling Range Hotel and the integrity of the Bellevue East Land Use Study Plan (BELUS) , considering the City spent $28 million on purchases of land around the oval and still have a few more to secure.”

A proposal for a petrol station will go before the Metro East Joint Development Assessment Panel next month after State Administrative Tribunal gave it a chance to reconsider the proposal it knocked back in December.

Save the Darling Range Hotel Action Group spokeswoman Jeni Hood said the City had failed in its duty under the Heritage Act, which requires local government to identity buildings of cultural heritage significance.

“Even though the City identified the hotel as a heritage place in the BELUS Plan, it then failed to assess the building for inclusion on the Municipal Inventory,” she said. “I was advised that a place not on the Municipal Inventory has far less chance of being placed on the State Heritage Register.

“We need to continue lobbying the City and tell them that their failure to maintain the Municipal Inventory is now being used as a nail in the coffin of this 112-year-old building.”