Families of students disengaged from mainstream schooling thrown a lifeline for new year

L-R: Richard Furber (Principal, Youth Futures Community School, which is part of Youth Futures and Comet Care Schools), Gaye Harrison (Administration and Student Support), Jackie Breach (Trainer), Vivienne O'Neill (Teacher) and Jane Hillis (Teacher). Photo: David Baylis
L-R: Richard Furber (Principal, Youth Futures Community School, which is part of Youth Futures and Comet Care Schools), Gaye Harrison (Administration and Student Support), Jackie Breach (Trainer), Vivienne O'Neill (Teacher) and Jane Hillis (Teacher). Photo: David Baylis

FAMILIES of young people disengaged from the mainstream schooling system have been thrown a lifeline after the Corridors College in Midland was placed under external administration in October due to management and financial issues.

Youth Futures WA chief executive Mark Waite said the Youth Futures Community School will open its doors to students this February at the previous Corridors College site in Cale Street.

“When we heard that Corridors College was going into administration we were very concerned for the existing students and what it meant for them,” he said.

“We were fortunate enough to be able to keep the college open until the end of 2018 so that students weren’t negatively impacted.

“Now we are looking forward to opening as Youth Futures Community School and providing disengaged young people the support, skills and opportunities they need to thrive.”

Youth Futures Community School will operate under the same model as Youth Futures’ Comet CaRE Schools which are located in Caversham, Clarkson and Albany.

As a Curriculum and Re-Engagement (CaRE) school, the campus operates very differently to mainstream schools in the area by providing a high staff to student ratio, access to youth workers, a clinical psychologist, Aboriginal engagement officer, and a numeracy and literacy coach.

“We operate under a holistic model where the focus is on the whole student and not just on their education, it’s about preparing students for life post school not simply completing compulsory school,” Mr Waite said.

“Our aim is for students to have a planned pathway once they finish with us and to provide support for this transition to be successful.

“We provide a safe learning environment that assists students to actively engage in and be responsible for their own education with the support of qualified staff.”